Monthly archive for ‘ September, 2019 ’

Gift for adopted home

20th September 2019 | Closed

NOONEknows for sure why Margaret Illukol –left shockingly disfigured after she was attacked by a hyena in Uganda as a child –sat down at her Cooks Hill home on March 10, 2005 and changed her will by hand, and without a witness.
南京夜网

She crossed out a paragraph of the formal will she drew up with a solicitor in 1992, that would have seen half her $1 million estatesent to a Rotary club in the Ugandan capital of Kampala.

Thosestrokes of her penleft just one beneficiary –the largely Hunter-based Rotary district 9670, whichbroughther to Australia as a teenager in the 1970s for significant and on-going surgery, supported her education,and later celebrated when she became a Newcastle nurse and an Australian citizen.

Margaret Illukol, who died after a fall in her home on February 15, 2015, repaid Hunter Rotarians by leaving her $1 million estate in their care to establish a trust to help people in her adopted home.

In a recent decision NSW Supreme Court Justice James Stevenson accepted that was her intent, after Ms Illukol’s executor and trustee, Newcastle solicitor Peter Evans, sought advice from the court about distributing her estate.

Justice Stevenson found Ms Illukol’s handwritten note on the will, that she wanted to “establish a fund in my name hopefully ongoing one”, referred to the retained bequest to “Newcastle Rotary District 967”.

“I think it clear that the deceased’s intention in striking through the paragraph which formerly provided a bequest to the Rotary club of Kampala was to revoke that bequest,” Justice Stevenson found.

“I have concluded that … the deceased intended, by her manuscript changes to the will of 10 March 2005, to revoke her instruction that her estate be divided in two and intended to express an intention, albeit relatively informally, to establish a fund for the benefit of the remaining named entity.”

Justice Stevenson found Mr Evans would be justified “to establish a fund in the name of the deceased to be used for the purpose of service in the community within the geographical boundaries of the Newcastle district, such service being confined to activities which are charitable in nature”.

Mr Evans’ late father James, who wasRoyal Newcastle Hospital board chairman and district governor of what was then known as Rotary district 967 in the early 1970s, did not think the region had the capacity to help the teenage Margaret when Ugandan Rotary clubs sought help from Australian Rotary.

Her injuries were so extreme, and the eight years that had passed since the attack whenshe was eight, left James Evans concerned that more than the most basic help was beyond even the most gifted surgeons, Peter Evans said.

But Toronto Rotarian Kevin Leary was determined,Mr Evans said.

Mr Leary, his wife Val and daughter Annette, 7, travelled to Uganda to find the 16-year-oldMargaret, establish her trust and return with her to Australia for treatment.

Mrs Leary remembers the teenage Margaret wore a mask to hide the horrific injuries she received when a hyena mauled her head as a child.Her jawbone was destroyed and largely cut off in a crude attempt to keep her alive before she could reachmedical help. Large parts of her face and mouth were torn away, including her nose.

In her book, Child of the Karimotong, MsIllukol wrote of the terrible hours after the hyena latched on to her head and dragged her away from a hut in a remote village in Uganda.

“Whatever was dragging me away was crawling on all fours. It dropped and picked me up several times as the bones of my face tore apart,” she wrote.

‘‘Something stopped me from screaming. All the noises I tried to make shut off in my mouth. I was dreamy and confused, out of my senses. I put out my hands to identify my attacker and found myself clinging to a furry coat. Then there was a gap: everything stopped.’’

Val Leary remembers the first time she saw the teenage Margaret, who was being cared for and educated by Irish nuns and could speak some English.

Rotary district 9670 governor Steve Jackson

“You could just see her eyes and she was very quiet,” Mrs Leary said.

It is estimated Ms Illukol underwent more than 70 operations. A number of Hunter Rotary families became her carers.

Mrs Leary and Mr Evans said Ms Illukol returned to Uganda up to three times as an adult to make contact with her extended family. Mr Evans said she was always generous.

“She’d given a lot away to Kampala but eventually she formed the view her family was more the people here,” he said.

He was unaware of the informal note and the changesMs Illukol made to her will in 2005 until after her death, but was pleased Justice Stevenson had accepted Ms Illukol’s intent.

“It’s up to Rotary to manage it for the benefit of people in need,” Mr Evans said.

Retired NSW local court magistrate and Rotary district 9670 governor Steve Jackson said he had been made aware of Justice Stevenson’s decision “and needless to say the district is very happy with the result”.

“We are in the process of establishing an appropriate trust, obviously for charitable purposes, the benefit of which will be available withinthe geographical limits of the district,” Mr Jackson said.

While the terms of the will prevented Rotary from using trust funds beyond the district, it could free up other district funds, he said.


Bushfire season: Regional communities on frontline

20th September 2019 | Closed

As an ecologist and a councillor with the Climate Council, I have had the privilege of meeting many of the dedicated Australian men and women who pick up a fire hose every summer to protect their communities. Firefighters who have seen how extreme heat and excessive fuel loads can combine to produce truly terrifying fires are often eager to share their experiences of how climate change is affecting the nature of firefighting.
南京夜网

One of the trends that worries firefighters most is the increasing frequency of “megafires” – like the 100km fire front that claimed 173 lives during the Black Saturday fires in 2009. These fires are so hot and move so fast that they act more like a storm than a fire, and can be virtually impossible to fight.

One of the most vexing problems posed by the climate change we have already experienced, in addition to increasing the bushfire threat, is that it is also hindering efforts to minimise that risk. As fire seasons lengthen, the window to conduct safe hazard reduction burning decreases.

Bundaberg volunteer firefighter Marilyn King has seen first-hand how bushfires and heatwaves have intensified in regional Queensland over the last decade. Her local brigade has the enormous challenge of protecting 93 per centof the land around her community – a task that has often left volunteers fatigued and forced to call on the already-stretched metropolitan crews to provide relief.

It’s the same story in the country’s south-east. In August 2014, for example, volunteer fire crews were pushed to breaking point as they faced 90 fires simultaneously.

Almost a yearago, the Great Ocean Road bushfires in the Separation Creek and Wye River regions destroyed more than 100 homes, while bushfires in the Sydney hinterland have already been placing pressure on fire services this season. With dry and hot conditions expected in NSW over the summer, the scene is set for a very damaging bushfire season.

In Victoria, the most vulnerable bushfire state, the combination of high forest fuel loads and predicted above-average temperatures has firefighting veterans extremely worried about the prospect of a devastating late summer outbreak.

We know Australia has always been a fire prone country. However, as climate change drives hotter, more intense heatwaves and drives up the odds of high-fire danger weather, the increasing severity and frequency of fires throughout Australia will strain our existing resources.

Many nations are making decisive moves to implement the goals of Paris Climate Agreement – aiming ultimately to ensure that global warming does not exceed 2 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels. But Australia, considered to be one the most vulnerable developed countries to the impacts of climate change, is lagging behind. Indeed, Australia was recently ranked third-last in the Climate Change Performance Index – an assessment of the climate policies of the top 58 CO2-emitting nations – just beating Kazakhstan and Saudi Arabia.

Put simply, Australia’s head-in-the-sand approach to climate change policy is contributing to a situation in which thousandswho put their lives on the line each summer to fight fires are at increased risk. Without a strong plan to transition energy systemstowards renewable energy as soon as possible, risks from extreme weather events will continue to increase.

As any firefighter will tell you, fire prevention is key. And climate action should be considered a key pillar of fire prevention efforts in Australia.


Pointing out the plus side of maths to youngsters

20th September 2019 | Closed

As a parent – or even teacher – you are likely to have been asked the question: “What’s the point of maths?”
南京夜网

This is often followed by: “When will I ever use this stuff?” or “How will maths help me later in life?”

These questions, not often asked of other school subjects, indicate that for some children, maths is seen as something belonging only to school classrooms.As parents it is not always easy to respond to questions such as these.

The questions young people ask about maths often relate to their personal experience of how they found maths in school, rather than questions about maths per se.

Reportssuggest that young people’s negative attitudes towards maths are increasing, even as early as primary school. This is largely due to the maths being taught as a recipe.

If we do A then B then C we get the correct answer to a problem we didn’t pose in the first place – and with little understanding of the ingredients.

Maths in schools is largely skills-based – such as learning how to determine internal angles of shapes or using formulas to determine volume or capacity – rather than a study of what mathematics actually is.

IT’S A PROBLEM: Reports suggest that young people’s negative attitudes towards maths are increasing.

Mathematics is a study of patterns and a means of representing and describing the world in terms of quantities, shapes, and relationships. This means that for many students, their understanding of mathematics is completing tasks set by a teacher rather than developing their own understanding of angles or volume or capacity.

Teachers could look for opportunities for students to use maths beyond the prescribed daily lesson (for example, location and orientation activities while playing sport, or patterning while learning music).

Parents could encourage their children to think about and use maths in every day contexts.For example, when travelling, children can look for patterns in car number plates (digits that are consecutive 3, 4, 5 or prime 2, 5, 7 or square 144). They might predict which routes are quickest while using updated data on mobile devices.

What is needed in our conversations with young people is a recognition that we use maths every day – perhaps without noticing it.Because the focus on maths in schools is on skills, rather than solving authentic problems, young people are discouraged from further study in this area.An overemphasis on the skills of maths (basic number facts, equations) at the expense of actually working as a mathematician (reasoning, problem solving, modelling, using technology) may then further disenfranchise young people.Between2000-2014, the percentage of students studying Advanced Mathematics fell from 11.9 per centto 9.6 per centand Intermediate Mathematics from 25 per centto 19.1 per cent.

A common misconception is that only a select handful of occupations use maths. But most occupations (for example, nurses, pilots, fashion designers, builders, journalists, truck drivers) use maths every day, often solving problems collaboratively.

Next time your child asks what is the point of maths, my answer would be that maths helps you to understand why things happen the way they do; predict what might happen in the future (using probability to work out how likely it will be that my favourite toy character will appear in a box of cereal); or solve puzzles to assist the heroine unlock the next level in the latest video game.

Kevin Larkin is lecturer (mathematics education) atGriffith University.


BoatingLuxury performer plays to the faithful

20th September 2019 | Closed

RTIZY RIDE: The newly released Maritimo M64, which recently crossed the Tasman under its own steam.AS the sun sets on 2016, Maritimo is putting the finishing touches to three 70-foot motor yachts, among quite a few others. One is heading to Fiji, another to Singapore and a third will be shipped to Texas with a piano installed in the flybridge.
南京夜网

It’s a Steinway no less, capable of hitting high Cs on the high seas. You can also expect to see features like pop-up treadmills in cabins as part of an increasing focus on customisation.

Literally nothing surprises in the current market where the rich get ritzier.

It’s all part of a crazily big year for the Gold Coast builder, and an even brighter future beckons. Six new models will debut at either Sanctuary Cove in May or the 50th Sydney International Boat Show in early August.

The aforementioned M70 has been a stand-out model for Maritimo, with 12 sold at a starting price of $3.04 million, and it’s to be followed by a S70 sedan developed for a Kiwi buyer.

A new M64 also crossed the ditch recently, not aboard a ship but on its own bum. The voyage from the Gold Coast to New Zealand took 138 sea hours and used 7500 litres of diesel at a 9-knot average. It was the eighth 64 sold since May at a $2.6 million base price.

European dealer Spencer Ship Monaco has landed multiple sales and a new Sri Lankan dealer has just been appointed, yet Australian sales still represent more than half of the manufacturing output.

“We’re proud of the fact that many of our customers are multiple boat owners, sometimes on their third or fourth Maritimo,” Australasian sales manager Ormonde Britton said. “They’re very loyal to the brand and our research shows they love the lifestyle.”

For the 2017 Sanctuary Cove boat show there will be a new M54 on show. It’s based on the best-selling M50 but has an extended fishing-oriented transom and some interior tweaks.

The all-new M59 will be tagged and released in February at Miami Boat Show before doing the Australian boat show rounds. A S59 single-level sedan variant called the S59 will follow suit at Sydney, sporting twin 725hp Volvo Penta D11 engines as standard and offering 800hp diesels as an option.

A new S64 is also scheduled for later in 2017.

Elandra, which Maritimo bought this year, has been read its last rites as a brand but will be reincarnated as a three-boat X Series. The X6 is based on the existing Elandra 53 but has had a hull extension to reach 60 feet … as have blueprints for the Elandra 46 that will become the X5 to signify 50 foot. An X7 – you guessed it, 70 feet – is also planned.A core feature of the X-tended X boats is a transom cabana that can be customised as a fourth cabin with queen bed, a bar and beach club, water sports centre or perhaps a flugelhorn conservatorium.

There’s also rumours of a new Maritimo being built as a high-end luxury offering competing for the hearts and minds of Palm Beach and Grand Banks buyers in the US. As the Bentley of picnic boats, it’s likely to be a 53-footer with long-range capabilities.

A new Maritimo Experience Centre will also open next month at Sanctuary Cove. See maritimo南京夜网南京性息.

THEY’RE COMING: A small flotilla of Catalina yachts will join a rendezvous on Lake Macquarie in January.


Pointing out the plus side of maths to youngsters

20th September 2019 | Closed

As a parent – or even teacher – you are likely to have been asked the question: “What’s the point of maths?”
南京夜网

This is often followed by: “When will I ever use this stuff?” or “How will maths help me later in life?”

These questions, not often asked of other school subjects, indicate that for some children, maths is seen as something belonging only to school classrooms.As parents it is not always easy to respond to questions such as these.

The questions young people ask about maths often relate to their personal experience of how they found maths in school, rather than questions about maths per se.

Reportssuggest that young people’s negative attitudes towards maths are increasing, even as early as primary school. This is largely due to the maths being taught as a recipe.

If we do A then B then C we get the correct answer to a problem we didn’t pose in the first place – and with little understanding of the ingredients.

Maths in schools is largely skills-based – such as learning how to determine internal angles of shapes or using formulas to determine volume or capacity – rather than a study of what mathematics actually is.

IT’S A PROBLEM: Reports suggest that young people’s negative attitudes towards maths are increasing.

Mathematics is a study of patterns and a means of representing and describing the world in terms of quantities, shapes, and relationships. This means that for many students, their understanding of mathematics is completing tasks set by a teacher rather than developing their own understanding of angles or volume or capacity.

Teachers could look for opportunities for students to use maths beyond the prescribed daily lesson (for example, location and orientation activities while playing sport, or patterning while learning music).

Parents could encourage their children to think about and use maths in every day contexts.For example, when travelling, children can look for patterns in car number plates (digits that are consecutive 3, 4, 5 or prime 2, 5, 7 or square 144). They might predict which routes are quickest while using updated data on mobile devices.

What is needed in our conversations with young people is a recognition that we use maths every day – perhaps without noticing it.Because the focus on maths in schools is on skills, rather than solving authentic problems, young people are discouraged from further study in this area.An overemphasis on the skills of maths (basic number facts, equations) at the expense of actually working as a mathematician (reasoning, problem solving, modelling, using technology) may then further disenfranchise young people.Between2000-2014, the percentage of students studying Advanced Mathematics fell from 11.9 per centto 9.6 per centand Intermediate Mathematics from 25 per centto 19.1 per cent.

A common misconception is that only a select handful of occupations use maths. But most occupations (for example, nurses, pilots, fashion designers, builders, journalists, truck drivers) use maths every day, often solving problems collaboratively.

Next time your child asks what is the point of maths, my answer would be that maths helps you to understand why things happen the way they do; predict what might happen in the future (using probability to work out how likely it will be that my favourite toy character will appear in a box of cereal); or solve puzzles to assist the heroine unlock the next level in the latest video game.

Kevin Larkin is lecturer (mathematics education) atGriffith University.