Archive for the ‘ 南京夜网 ’ Category

Gift for adopted home

20th September 2019 | Closed

NOONEknows for sure why Margaret Illukol –left shockingly disfigured after she was attacked by a hyena in Uganda as a child –sat down at her Cooks Hill home on March 10, 2005 and changed her will by hand, and without a witness.
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She crossed out a paragraph of the formal will she drew up with a solicitor in 1992, that would have seen half her $1 million estatesent to a Rotary club in the Ugandan capital of Kampala.

Thosestrokes of her penleft just one beneficiary –the largely Hunter-based Rotary district 9670, whichbroughther to Australia as a teenager in the 1970s for significant and on-going surgery, supported her education,and later celebrated when she became a Newcastle nurse and an Australian citizen.

Margaret Illukol, who died after a fall in her home on February 15, 2015, repaid Hunter Rotarians by leaving her $1 million estate in their care to establish a trust to help people in her adopted home.

In a recent decision NSW Supreme Court Justice James Stevenson accepted that was her intent, after Ms Illukol’s executor and trustee, Newcastle solicitor Peter Evans, sought advice from the court about distributing her estate.

Justice Stevenson found Ms Illukol’s handwritten note on the will, that she wanted to “establish a fund in my name hopefully ongoing one”, referred to the retained bequest to “Newcastle Rotary District 967”.

“I think it clear that the deceased’s intention in striking through the paragraph which formerly provided a bequest to the Rotary club of Kampala was to revoke that bequest,” Justice Stevenson found.

“I have concluded that … the deceased intended, by her manuscript changes to the will of 10 March 2005, to revoke her instruction that her estate be divided in two and intended to express an intention, albeit relatively informally, to establish a fund for the benefit of the remaining named entity.”

Justice Stevenson found Mr Evans would be justified “to establish a fund in the name of the deceased to be used for the purpose of service in the community within the geographical boundaries of the Newcastle district, such service being confined to activities which are charitable in nature”.

Mr Evans’ late father James, who wasRoyal Newcastle Hospital board chairman and district governor of what was then known as Rotary district 967 in the early 1970s, did not think the region had the capacity to help the teenage Margaret when Ugandan Rotary clubs sought help from Australian Rotary.

Her injuries were so extreme, and the eight years that had passed since the attack whenshe was eight, left James Evans concerned that more than the most basic help was beyond even the most gifted surgeons, Peter Evans said.

But Toronto Rotarian Kevin Leary was determined,Mr Evans said.

Mr Leary, his wife Val and daughter Annette, 7, travelled to Uganda to find the 16-year-oldMargaret, establish her trust and return with her to Australia for treatment.

Mrs Leary remembers the teenage Margaret wore a mask to hide the horrific injuries she received when a hyena mauled her head as a child.Her jawbone was destroyed and largely cut off in a crude attempt to keep her alive before she could reachmedical help. Large parts of her face and mouth were torn away, including her nose.

In her book, Child of the Karimotong, MsIllukol wrote of the terrible hours after the hyena latched on to her head and dragged her away from a hut in a remote village in Uganda.

“Whatever was dragging me away was crawling on all fours. It dropped and picked me up several times as the bones of my face tore apart,” she wrote.

‘‘Something stopped me from screaming. All the noises I tried to make shut off in my mouth. I was dreamy and confused, out of my senses. I put out my hands to identify my attacker and found myself clinging to a furry coat. Then there was a gap: everything stopped.’’

Val Leary remembers the first time she saw the teenage Margaret, who was being cared for and educated by Irish nuns and could speak some English.

Rotary district 9670 governor Steve Jackson

“You could just see her eyes and she was very quiet,” Mrs Leary said.

It is estimated Ms Illukol underwent more than 70 operations. A number of Hunter Rotary families became her carers.

Mrs Leary and Mr Evans said Ms Illukol returned to Uganda up to three times as an adult to make contact with her extended family. Mr Evans said she was always generous.

“She’d given a lot away to Kampala but eventually she formed the view her family was more the people here,” he said.

He was unaware of the informal note and the changesMs Illukol made to her will in 2005 until after her death, but was pleased Justice Stevenson had accepted Ms Illukol’s intent.

“It’s up to Rotary to manage it for the benefit of people in need,” Mr Evans said.

Retired NSW local court magistrate and Rotary district 9670 governor Steve Jackson said he had been made aware of Justice Stevenson’s decision “and needless to say the district is very happy with the result”.

“We are in the process of establishing an appropriate trust, obviously for charitable purposes, the benefit of which will be available withinthe geographical limits of the district,” Mr Jackson said.

While the terms of the will prevented Rotary from using trust funds beyond the district, it could free up other district funds, he said.


Bushfire season: Regional communities on frontline

20th September 2019 | Closed

As an ecologist and a councillor with the Climate Council, I have had the privilege of meeting many of the dedicated Australian men and women who pick up a fire hose every summer to protect their communities. Firefighters who have seen how extreme heat and excessive fuel loads can combine to produce truly terrifying fires are often eager to share their experiences of how climate change is affecting the nature of firefighting.
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One of the trends that worries firefighters most is the increasing frequency of “megafires” – like the 100km fire front that claimed 173 lives during the Black Saturday fires in 2009. These fires are so hot and move so fast that they act more like a storm than a fire, and can be virtually impossible to fight.

One of the most vexing problems posed by the climate change we have already experienced, in addition to increasing the bushfire threat, is that it is also hindering efforts to minimise that risk. As fire seasons lengthen, the window to conduct safe hazard reduction burning decreases.

Bundaberg volunteer firefighter Marilyn King has seen first-hand how bushfires and heatwaves have intensified in regional Queensland over the last decade. Her local brigade has the enormous challenge of protecting 93 per centof the land around her community – a task that has often left volunteers fatigued and forced to call on the already-stretched metropolitan crews to provide relief.

It’s the same story in the country’s south-east. In August 2014, for example, volunteer fire crews were pushed to breaking point as they faced 90 fires simultaneously.

Almost a yearago, the Great Ocean Road bushfires in the Separation Creek and Wye River regions destroyed more than 100 homes, while bushfires in the Sydney hinterland have already been placing pressure on fire services this season. With dry and hot conditions expected in NSW over the summer, the scene is set for a very damaging bushfire season.

In Victoria, the most vulnerable bushfire state, the combination of high forest fuel loads and predicted above-average temperatures has firefighting veterans extremely worried about the prospect of a devastating late summer outbreak.

We know Australia has always been a fire prone country. However, as climate change drives hotter, more intense heatwaves and drives up the odds of high-fire danger weather, the increasing severity and frequency of fires throughout Australia will strain our existing resources.

Many nations are making decisive moves to implement the goals of Paris Climate Agreement – aiming ultimately to ensure that global warming does not exceed 2 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels. But Australia, considered to be one the most vulnerable developed countries to the impacts of climate change, is lagging behind. Indeed, Australia was recently ranked third-last in the Climate Change Performance Index – an assessment of the climate policies of the top 58 CO2-emitting nations – just beating Kazakhstan and Saudi Arabia.

Put simply, Australia’s head-in-the-sand approach to climate change policy is contributing to a situation in which thousandswho put their lives on the line each summer to fight fires are at increased risk. Without a strong plan to transition energy systemstowards renewable energy as soon as possible, risks from extreme weather events will continue to increase.

As any firefighter will tell you, fire prevention is key. And climate action should be considered a key pillar of fire prevention efforts in Australia.


Pointing out the plus side of maths to youngsters

20th September 2019 | Closed

As a parent – or even teacher – you are likely to have been asked the question: “What’s the point of maths?”
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This is often followed by: “When will I ever use this stuff?” or “How will maths help me later in life?”

These questions, not often asked of other school subjects, indicate that for some children, maths is seen as something belonging only to school classrooms.As parents it is not always easy to respond to questions such as these.

The questions young people ask about maths often relate to their personal experience of how they found maths in school, rather than questions about maths per se.

Reportssuggest that young people’s negative attitudes towards maths are increasing, even as early as primary school. This is largely due to the maths being taught as a recipe.

If we do A then B then C we get the correct answer to a problem we didn’t pose in the first place – and with little understanding of the ingredients.

Maths in schools is largely skills-based – such as learning how to determine internal angles of shapes or using formulas to determine volume or capacity – rather than a study of what mathematics actually is.

IT’S A PROBLEM: Reports suggest that young people’s negative attitudes towards maths are increasing.

Mathematics is a study of patterns and a means of representing and describing the world in terms of quantities, shapes, and relationships. This means that for many students, their understanding of mathematics is completing tasks set by a teacher rather than developing their own understanding of angles or volume or capacity.

Teachers could look for opportunities for students to use maths beyond the prescribed daily lesson (for example, location and orientation activities while playing sport, or patterning while learning music).

Parents could encourage their children to think about and use maths in every day contexts.For example, when travelling, children can look for patterns in car number plates (digits that are consecutive 3, 4, 5 or prime 2, 5, 7 or square 144). They might predict which routes are quickest while using updated data on mobile devices.

What is needed in our conversations with young people is a recognition that we use maths every day – perhaps without noticing it.Because the focus on maths in schools is on skills, rather than solving authentic problems, young people are discouraged from further study in this area.An overemphasis on the skills of maths (basic number facts, equations) at the expense of actually working as a mathematician (reasoning, problem solving, modelling, using technology) may then further disenfranchise young people.Between2000-2014, the percentage of students studying Advanced Mathematics fell from 11.9 per centto 9.6 per centand Intermediate Mathematics from 25 per centto 19.1 per cent.

A common misconception is that only a select handful of occupations use maths. But most occupations (for example, nurses, pilots, fashion designers, builders, journalists, truck drivers) use maths every day, often solving problems collaboratively.

Next time your child asks what is the point of maths, my answer would be that maths helps you to understand why things happen the way they do; predict what might happen in the future (using probability to work out how likely it will be that my favourite toy character will appear in a box of cereal); or solve puzzles to assist the heroine unlock the next level in the latest video game.

Kevin Larkin is lecturer (mathematics education) atGriffith University.


BoatingLuxury performer plays to the faithful

20th September 2019 | Closed

RTIZY RIDE: The newly released Maritimo M64, which recently crossed the Tasman under its own steam.AS the sun sets on 2016, Maritimo is putting the finishing touches to three 70-foot motor yachts, among quite a few others. One is heading to Fiji, another to Singapore and a third will be shipped to Texas with a piano installed in the flybridge.
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It’s a Steinway no less, capable of hitting high Cs on the high seas. You can also expect to see features like pop-up treadmills in cabins as part of an increasing focus on customisation.

Literally nothing surprises in the current market where the rich get ritzier.

It’s all part of a crazily big year for the Gold Coast builder, and an even brighter future beckons. Six new models will debut at either Sanctuary Cove in May or the 50th Sydney International Boat Show in early August.

The aforementioned M70 has been a stand-out model for Maritimo, with 12 sold at a starting price of $3.04 million, and it’s to be followed by a S70 sedan developed for a Kiwi buyer.

A new M64 also crossed the ditch recently, not aboard a ship but on its own bum. The voyage from the Gold Coast to New Zealand took 138 sea hours and used 7500 litres of diesel at a 9-knot average. It was the eighth 64 sold since May at a $2.6 million base price.

European dealer Spencer Ship Monaco has landed multiple sales and a new Sri Lankan dealer has just been appointed, yet Australian sales still represent more than half of the manufacturing output.

“We’re proud of the fact that many of our customers are multiple boat owners, sometimes on their third or fourth Maritimo,” Australasian sales manager Ormonde Britton said. “They’re very loyal to the brand and our research shows they love the lifestyle.”

For the 2017 Sanctuary Cove boat show there will be a new M54 on show. It’s based on the best-selling M50 but has an extended fishing-oriented transom and some interior tweaks.

The all-new M59 will be tagged and released in February at Miami Boat Show before doing the Australian boat show rounds. A S59 single-level sedan variant called the S59 will follow suit at Sydney, sporting twin 725hp Volvo Penta D11 engines as standard and offering 800hp diesels as an option.

A new S64 is also scheduled for later in 2017.

Elandra, which Maritimo bought this year, has been read its last rites as a brand but will be reincarnated as a three-boat X Series. The X6 is based on the existing Elandra 53 but has had a hull extension to reach 60 feet … as have blueprints for the Elandra 46 that will become the X5 to signify 50 foot. An X7 – you guessed it, 70 feet – is also planned.A core feature of the X-tended X boats is a transom cabana that can be customised as a fourth cabin with queen bed, a bar and beach club, water sports centre or perhaps a flugelhorn conservatorium.

There’s also rumours of a new Maritimo being built as a high-end luxury offering competing for the hearts and minds of Palm Beach and Grand Banks buyers in the US. As the Bentley of picnic boats, it’s likely to be a 53-footer with long-range capabilities.

A new Maritimo Experience Centre will also open next month at Sanctuary Cove. See maritimo南京夜网南京性息.

THEY’RE COMING: A small flotilla of Catalina yachts will join a rendezvous on Lake Macquarie in January.


Pointing out the plus side of maths to youngsters

20th September 2019 | Closed

As a parent – or even teacher – you are likely to have been asked the question: “What’s the point of maths?”
南京夜网

This is often followed by: “When will I ever use this stuff?” or “How will maths help me later in life?”

These questions, not often asked of other school subjects, indicate that for some children, maths is seen as something belonging only to school classrooms.As parents it is not always easy to respond to questions such as these.

The questions young people ask about maths often relate to their personal experience of how they found maths in school, rather than questions about maths per se.

Reportssuggest that young people’s negative attitudes towards maths are increasing, even as early as primary school. This is largely due to the maths being taught as a recipe.

If we do A then B then C we get the correct answer to a problem we didn’t pose in the first place – and with little understanding of the ingredients.

Maths in schools is largely skills-based – such as learning how to determine internal angles of shapes or using formulas to determine volume or capacity – rather than a study of what mathematics actually is.

IT’S A PROBLEM: Reports suggest that young people’s negative attitudes towards maths are increasing.

Mathematics is a study of patterns and a means of representing and describing the world in terms of quantities, shapes, and relationships. This means that for many students, their understanding of mathematics is completing tasks set by a teacher rather than developing their own understanding of angles or volume or capacity.

Teachers could look for opportunities for students to use maths beyond the prescribed daily lesson (for example, location and orientation activities while playing sport, or patterning while learning music).

Parents could encourage their children to think about and use maths in every day contexts.For example, when travelling, children can look for patterns in car number plates (digits that are consecutive 3, 4, 5 or prime 2, 5, 7 or square 144). They might predict which routes are quickest while using updated data on mobile devices.

What is needed in our conversations with young people is a recognition that we use maths every day – perhaps without noticing it.Because the focus on maths in schools is on skills, rather than solving authentic problems, young people are discouraged from further study in this area.An overemphasis on the skills of maths (basic number facts, equations) at the expense of actually working as a mathematician (reasoning, problem solving, modelling, using technology) may then further disenfranchise young people.Between2000-2014, the percentage of students studying Advanced Mathematics fell from 11.9 per centto 9.6 per centand Intermediate Mathematics from 25 per centto 19.1 per cent.

A common misconception is that only a select handful of occupations use maths. But most occupations (for example, nurses, pilots, fashion designers, builders, journalists, truck drivers) use maths every day, often solving problems collaboratively.

Next time your child asks what is the point of maths, my answer would be that maths helps you to understand why things happen the way they do; predict what might happen in the future (using probability to work out how likely it will be that my favourite toy character will appear in a box of cereal); or solve puzzles to assist the heroine unlock the next level in the latest video game.

Kevin Larkin is lecturer (mathematics education) atGriffith University.


Short Takes: Thursday, December 8, 2016

20th August 2019 | Closed

I THINK that very soon the only people using the CBD will be those who live or work there.With shrinking parking opportunities and poor public transport from the suburbs, the CBD looks less attractive every day. Many of the largest employers have moved west or out of the city altogether.
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I can be at Kotara or Charlestown in 10 to 15 minutes where there are major department stores and ample free parking. I see the CBD’s future as an expensive residential area that has become irrelevant to the rest of the city. Makes me wonder if the ethereal light rail will even be necessary.

Ruth Burrell,MerewetherTO Peter Newey (Short Takes,3/12), I thought that by the number oflettersyou write thatyou were an expert on all topics. But alas, no – otherwise if you had read a paper or listened to the radio you should have known the V8s were leaving Olympic Park at Homebush because the government is redeveloping the entire precinct. Let’s all enjoy the cars when they come to the city and reap in the multiple benefits they will bring.

Rick Johnson, Mount HuttonFOUR-wheel drivers have broken down fences to access North Stockton Beach, near the pre-school, in a residential area. Obviously not content to use the legal areas from Birubi Beach down to Lavis Lane. I have just taken a photo of one, set up on the beach, off Mitchell Street, looking very comfortable.

I have the registration number. Port Stephens council obviously doesn’t care about that area.

The dangers to the beach and vegetation, not to mention children playing on the sand, don’t seem to be an issue. Free camping of course.

Helen Perry, North LambtonTHE Wallabies seem to be on the wrong side of every 55/45decision.

Peter Hay, IslingtonSORRY Newcastle Jets,it is just too hard to keep supporting you. Too many disappointments. Until you get players who can actually form a competitive team, I will just have to find another team.

Daryll Hadfield,RedheadNEWCASTLE JetsNil – is that their new name?

Bill Slicer, Tighes HillTHE POLLSWould you pay a premium price for parking if it guaranteed you a space at the front door?

Yes 24%, No 76%Is Merewether beach the Hunter’s most “authentically Australian”?

Yes 51%, No 49%Could Newcastle’s Supercars track live up to the “Monaco of the southern hemisphere” hype?

Yes 72%, No 28%What should be built on the latest Honeysuckle site to hit the market?

Shop-top residential 25%, Commercial 23%, Other 22%, Hotel 20%, Retail 10%


Newcastle District Cricket Association: Belmont bowler Jace Lawson reaches 500 first grade wickets

20th August 2019 | Closed

MILESTONE: Belmont paceman Jace Lawson chalked up his 500th first grade wicket for Belmont on Saturday. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers.It has taken almost two decades and a countless number of overs, but Belmont paceman Jace Lawson has become the 12th player to reach 500 first grade wickets in the Newcastle district competition.
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The 34-year-old left-armer clocked up the significant milestone on Saturday with his first victim of the second innings en route to an outright victory for the league leaders away against Waratah-Mayfield.

“I was more relieved than anything because I didn’t get a breakthrough in the first innings,” Lawson said.

“But it’s been a lot of bowling [over the years] and I’m feeling it.I was bowling at least 25 to 30 overs a game there for quite a long time. That doesn’t happen these days, but now I’m sorer from 10 overs compared to back then.”

But the seasoned campaigner has pushed through the pain, most recently an unidentified right-knee injury, to continue on Belmont’s frontline.

Management is paramount and he will sit out their upcoming round nine fixture at home against third-placed Toronto in order to be fully fit for next weekend’s one-day decider.

It will be Lawson’s first Tom Locker Cup final, playing against University at No.1 Sportsground on December 18, after missing his club’s last appearance in 2003-2004 when overseas.

“Finals have been pretty rare,” Lawson said. “I can’t wait.”

Lawson also has the chance to add a premiership to his lone prize from 2008-2009 and the forklift driver from Macquarie Hills can’t recall a better start to a summer, with the Cahill Oval lads dropping only one game and sitting nine points clear on top of the ladder.

“It’s the best start I can remember to a season I’veplayed in,” he said.

“Normally we get to Christmas and we’re in a spot to have a crack at the semis. But now we control it. It’s up to us where we finish, rather than relying on other teams.”

Part of Belmont’ssuccesshas been three tons scored by skipper Mark Littlewood.

Part of it has beennew recruits like Greg Hunt and Jesse Major.

But part of it has remained Lawson consistently playing his role in the team with 15 wickets at an average of 13.33.

He now has 503 wickets, starting with 4-20 on debut against Wallsend as a teenager in the late 1990s and peaking with a career best 58 scalps in 2014-2015.

It puts him within reach of Jack Bull (509) but a long way from record holder Ken Hill (1128). The only other current player ahead of Lawson is Hamilton-Wickham’sSam Webber (536).Belmont’s previous highestwas David Wrixon (380). Lawson’s best figures are 8-43.

Statistics are courtesy of Wallsend scorer Jack Brown.


Renew Newcastle moves beyond its inner-city turf and shifts its focus to surrounding suburbs.

20th August 2019 | Closed

New territory: Renew Newcastle general manager Christopher Saunders in Newcastle West. Picture: Penelope GreenIF you ownan empty retail building in Hamiltonand surrounds and you like Renew Newcastle’s record of spacereactivation, call them.
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General manager Christopher Saunders has made the appeal to building ownersas Renew spreads its tentacles as opportunities in its traditional stomping ground of inner-city Newcastle dry up.

Renew is, he says, “excited” by the purchase of the Hunter Street mall precinct by Sydney-based hotelier and developer Iris Capital, whose CEO Sam Arnaout has described himself as a“real believer” in Newcastle.

“There’s a new buyer and lease of life coming in, it’s what we’ve always supported and we’d like to work with the new owner,” he said.

Mr Saunders says Renew’s five-year effort to reactivate the inner-city byplacing about 80 artists, cultural projects and community groups in disused buildings until they become commercially viable or were redeveloped had boosted the mall’s valueand decreased crime there.

“What Renew offers is the opportunity to bring life and vibrancy back into the street, which will lure other commercial entrepreneurs, which is what has happened in the Mall and is evidenced by the fact we don’t have any more buildings [to reactivate] there,” he said.

As such, Renew has quietly been making inroads into other suburbs: in Hamilton, it has leased out the top floor of the Clock Tower to eight photographers who are using both office space and a converted studio.

In recent days, it has placed educator, singer-songwriter and teacher “Lu Quade” (Luke Wade) into a building on Maitland Road,Islington, owned by someone whose own artistic endeavours were intially supported by Renew in an exhibition at The Emporium (the former David Jones building).

Mr Saunders says Renew would “love to access” 14 empty shops in Beaumont Street, where business owners say there has been a marked increase in crime since the truncation of the city’s rail line.

“We’d love to access them,” he says.“You could say crime has increased there, but I’d argue that itinerants are more likely to be victims of crime. The [truncation] has impacted on businesses but this is change, and we need to work as a community.”

Renew is keen to work with Hamilton building owners to help them activate their retail space, adding value to their property and deterring crime.

“In the time that Renew has been in Newcastle there’s been a 25.6 per cent reduction each year in property crime,” Mr Saunders says.“We’ll keep your building safe and bring a potential long-term tenant that might lead to a commercial outcome.”

See renewnewcastle.org.


Letters to the Editor: Thursday, December 8, 2016

20th August 2019 | Closed

STANDARDS SLIPPING: Reader Leonard Buckland says a loss of local control has eroded the quality of service from his family’s home care provider.
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THERE is a festering problem in our care services, and it worries me because I have seen it develop over this past year.I am very concerned about what I have seen and experienced, particularly with the marvellous home care workers. I am not qualified to comment on behalf of these hard-working people, but have become aware of reasons why they are experiencing considerable stress in carrying out their duties.

I have had experience with the NSW service for over 20 years, firstly when my wife suffered a stroke and I cared for her with their assistance from time to time for 18 years. In recent years it is myself, with assistance in the mornings.

I had never had a complaint about the service in all the years whileit was administered by an office in Cardiff. Early this year, the service was taken over and it isan entirely different story with the change of administration. I have had a number of complaints, even writinglettersto the general manager in their Melbourne office.I have never had the courtesy of the acknowledgement of my communication and that’s not just one occasion.

I can’t help butnotice some of the people coming from the service don’t seem to be those bright happy souls any more that I have known in the past.

The privatisation with the change in administration of NSW home care has fiercely eroded the quality of this service.I would now call it home service because the care seems to have been lost by the new owners in the transmission to its administration.

Now with the Christmas and New Year festivities fast approaching, I would urge people to pause for a moment and think about all these people that continue through all the times of festivities carrying out their duties in all the health, caring and disability services regardless of what day of the year it is.

Leonard Buckland,BooragulIt’s all about imageOUR civic leaders appearto have accepted the claims of V8 Supercars that the event planned for Newcastlewill inject more than$50 million into our economy, create many jobs and entice people from all over the world to visit our wonderful, vibrant city.

These claims have not only failed to be substantiated, I believe they are quite the reverse. We know from the Auditor General’s reports into races in Canberra and Homebush, for instance, that the economic rewards of these races fell far short of the mark.

Even James Warburton, the CEO of V8 Supercars, conceded that “the Olympic Park has its limitations around what we can and can’t build in terms of grandstands and various other things we could do”. Imagine what they are planning to do here, in our heritage precinct.

But whether the event is a ‘success’ or not doesn’t matter. It will be hailed a success no matter what, just as all the promoters of mega car races in other cities have done. This is because the economic benefits to the city are not the point.

What matters to our civic leaders is that they are associated with a winner.It is the winning image that matters,not whether it is a real win for the city.So they don’t have to ask whether taxpayer dollars are being well spent, compared sayto a permanent racing facility that could be built in Newcastle.

All their dealings with the race promoters are being kept secret so no one will know anyway.

What we have been sold is a marketing ploy, with Newcastle promoting itself alongside speed, car fumes, insufferable noise and alcohol – with scant regard for the permanent changes made to our beautiful heritage conservation area, and the welfare of residents within the circuit who have never been party to any of these decisions but who will have to bare the brunt of these decisions for 10 stressful weeks every year.

Christine Everingham, Newcastle EastWater affrontI HAVEjust heard of the extensive development that is to occur on the block 151-155 Brighton Avenue, Toronto. We have recently purchased a property that we plan to retire to in The Brighton, 149 Brighton Avenue.

We were attracted to the beautiful park and the village atmosphere Toronto offers. The waterfront along this stretch of Lake Macquarie is beautiful. Having grown up in the area it was always our dream to retire and enjoy the lake.

I am greatly saddened that the council could consider this size and style of development appropriate for this site. I believe it contravenes council regulations but it goes much further than that. It is a very unattractive building that is of such a size that itcannot be anything other than a dominating feature.

People walk along the waterfront and down to the park and it culminates not in a transition area of leafy houses or passive development. It is a huge monolith of housing development style concrete and glass.

Not only does it set a worrying precedent of greed over need, it also gives the future of Toronto a new unappealing semi-commercial intensive character. I think the whole council and every councillorneeds to ask themselves–“Is this what I want to be remembered for?” Please think very carefully before approving this development.

Kate Sommerville,GlenifferMore pain for PortAS if residents of Port Stephens haven’t been punished enough by Defence and government neglect with the poisons being pumped out of Williamtown RAAF Base, in afew months they will be hit by the extreme noise levels from the bucket of bolts that other nations have rejected – the F-35, so-called strike fighter.

That’s if if they can ever get one to fly. It’sa bigger lemon than the Leyland P76 car.

I challenge people to research detailson it, particularly the opinions of defence experts. It is the main reason we have a so-called budget emergency.​

Brian Crooks, SconeJust want the truthMARGARET Priest (‘Hypocrite Hillary’, Letters, 3/12) says Hillary Clinton is hypocritical because she supports a recount of votes in three states, after saying it was “horrifying”that Donald Trump suggested he might not accept the result of the election.

I disagree. Mrs Clinton is not refusing to accept the result, she is supporting the result being correctly arrived at. Maybe in a ‘post-truth’ world there is no longer such a thing as an accurate tally of votes, but let us at least accept that it might be possible.

Michael Jameson, New Lambton


Running light rail entirely in corridor a win-win

20th August 2019 | Closed

LOSE-LOSE: The author argues that running light rail down Hunter Street would adversely affect the university, business, traffic management and commuters.The increase of university student numbers in the city to 10000 is very welcome. However, the massive adverse impacts of trams in Hunter Street, as described by experts at Council Voice and in Cabinet Minute Document 71, as set out below, would remain, exacerbated by the additional numbers of students.
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That the university may wish to build on the rail corridor, however, prompts serious consideration of a win-win solution; enabling Newcastle to have reasonable development, of reasonable height, in reasonable locations, without being saddled with the extremely adverse impacts of trams in Hunter Street.

The concept is for light rail to run, not in Hunter/Scott streets but in the rail corridor, underneath buildings. According to a professional engineering report from Transport Australia, Society of Engineers Australia, light rail could be implemented entirely in the rail corridor, much sooner than trams in Hunter Street and at significantly lower cost.

Council’s zoning power, which it still retains, is the key to whether Newcastle achieves this win-win solution of rail in the corridor or the lose-lose outcome of serious problems created by trams in Hunter Street. However, the current council rezoning resolution precludes implementation of light rail in the corridor. If rezoning proceeds without providing for light rail in the corridor, Newcastle will have lost forever the opportunity for the very best solution to those problems.

We strongly urge council to exercise its rezoning power by amending its submission to the rezoning process, to ensure that legislation and zoning instruments provide for rail transport to run entirely in the rail corridor to Newcastle Station, and for rail vehicles to be required to run underneath reasonable corridor development.The problems arising from trams in Hunter Street would be eliminated and the government would have higher capacity, faster, safer, partiallysegregated running of light rail on the corridor. Some of the adverse effects of running light rail in Hunter Street are:

space constraints eliminating the urban renewal initiatives proposed by council for Hunter Street such as cycling, trees, wider footpaths, outdoor dining and car parkingextreme traffic congestionproposed expansion to 10000 university students would soak up 100 per cent of proposed tram capacity.serious disruption to business in Hunter/Scott streets during relocation of underground services and constructionloss of street parkingan average street tram journey time of 17 minutes between Wickham and Pacific Park for which commuters will not accept, preferring to drive cars adding to traffic congestion and parking problemsadditional cost of about $100 million.These problems would adversely affect the university as a major user of Hunter Street, business, council’s traffic management, commuters and residents. All would benefit, if light rail were to run in the rail corridor. The evidence in favour of rail in the corridor is overwhelming and comes from transport experts, and even includes the government’s own transport experts.

We urge council, business organisations, the university, developers and government tosupportthat running light rail on the rail corridor, beneath buildings would be a better outcome, representing a win-win for all stakeholders compared with the lose-lose presently in front of us.

Alan Squire is convenor ofHunterTransport for Business Development